An Evening Walk In Burwood Park

The storm clears

The rivers run and sigh

Flowing streams of tears

The grass shake off their manes bright and green

And the possums gather looking for bread

As the moon smiles upon the earth’s sheen

Steam rises from its manholes

Emitting the stench of its deep underbelly

I walk along Burwood park and Coles

And my bonsai breathes a sigh of relief

The rain is gone

But where is the sun?

It can scarcely wait till dawn

Incredible Chicken

On an evening stroll along the streets of Strathfield, I saw a now abandoned construction site. A shed was in the middle. It had no door. Its dark unlit cavern emitted the sound of scrapes and clinks. A Korean man with a black receding hairline and a white tank top was pumping his arms on top of a mound of dirt. He worked with a vigor and speed that was more appropriate for 7 am than 7 pm. I couldn’t stand to watch. The orange glow of the sky turned purple, its tone telling me that I had to return home to fix something edible for my wife. It was getting dark.

“Baek Sang Min, are you still going?” The voice rang out and cascaded over the shed. All but 1 other man had left. Sang Min had been like this the whole day. The only response was an affirmative grunt. The other worker sighed, took his bucket helmet off and before long was a fading neon speck approaching the Boulevard. It was happy hour.

There was a stillness that lay heavy on the air broken only by the chirp of magpies. Sang Min looked around and realized he was alone at last. This was the 1st time he had stopped working all day. “Sang Min.” A voice croaked from behind the mound, not from weakness but an ancient power. Behind the mound was a gaping black hole. Its bottom was invisible. From below came faint chirps and one could just make out a giant yellow eye as it glinted out at Sang Min.

“It’s time.” Sang Min moved closer to the hole. Trembling, he bent over, hands over his knees and retched. All he had eaten that day was regurgitated into the darkness and was devoured in a harmony of gulps and tweets. He fell onto all fours from the effort. The feathers under his neon vests ruffled. A claw the size of his body came out of the pit and lay gently on top of him. Its talons surrounded him both caressing and caging him in. “Thank you”, the voice crooned. “Don’t forget next time. You know what happened to your siblings. I think you would taste especially great in snow cheese.” “Yes your Incredible highness.” Sang Min staggered out of the shed and before long, the site was cloaked in darkness except for that yellow unblinking eye.